Category Archives: Iceland

Changes in Bárdarbunga Caldera

Interesting developments detailed in the latest on the Bárdarbunga Volcano, published by the incredible Carl of the Volcano Café. Recommended reading once more. Reblogged with much gratitude.

VolcanoCafé

Image of the Holuhraun eruption taken by the Volcanocafé Productions Film expedition to Bárdarbunga. This image is from the upcoming film by Eggert Norddahl, Bergsveinn Norddahl and Nick Small. Produced by Volcanocafé. Image of the Holuhraun eruption taken by the Volcanocafé Productions Film expedition to Bárdarbunga. This image is from the upcoming film by Eggert Norddahl, Bergsveinn Norddahl and Nick Small. Produced by Volcanocafé.

During a scientific over flight a marked and unexpected drop was noticed in the caldera floor of the Bárdarbunga Central Volcano. The drop was 15 meters, and is as such the largest deformation of a caldera in Iceland. It is interpreted as the result of magma leaving the magmatic reservoir under the caldera floor.

If this number is valid for all of the 11 by 7km caldera it equals to a volume of drained magma of 808 million cubic meters, or just shy of a cubic kilometer. This does not take into account magma that has come into the system during this episode

Image of the Holuhraun eruption taken by the Volcanocafé Productions Film expedition to Bárdarbunga. This image is from the upcoming film by Eggert Norddahl, Bergsveinn Norddahl and Nick Small. Produced by Volcanocafé. Image of the Holuhraun eruption taken by the Volcanocafé Productions Film expedition to Bárdarbunga. This…

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Bardarbunga Update 20140903

The latest assessment of the Bardarbunga eruption provided by the amazing folk at the Volcano Café. Recommended reading once more. Thank you Carl and Henrik.

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Holuhraun eruption looking north from Dyngjujökull (Photograph by Einar Gudmann) Holuhraun eruption looking north from Dyngjujökull (Photograph by Einar Gudmann)

Since the appropriate Icelandic authorities have today publicly mentioned the possibility of a large, acidic and explosive eruption at Bardarbunga, we now feel free to inform you that this possibility has been discussed by the Dragons, behind closed doors, for well over a week. The key information comes from this official IMO graphic:

The first premise is that earthquakes do not occur in molten rock. Nor do they form a clearly visible ring shape such as the above except under one circumstance – they do so around a body of liquid, in this case magma. A conservative estimate places the size of this body of magma at 8 km diameter, height unknown but most likely on the order of 3 – 6 km, depth also unknown but relatively shallow. Using simple geometry, 4 x Pi x r3 / 3…

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Bárðarbunga reader question

Interesting assessment of the Bardabunga intrusion from the resourceful Volcano Café blog. Recommended reading indeed. Thank you Carl – very much appreciated.

VolcanoCafé

Image by Tom. Upper part shows a closed propagating dyke. The lower shows a rift open down to the mantle. The upper version draws its magma from a central volcano, the lower from the mantle. Upper alternative would give a smaller eruption than the lower. Image by Margaret E. Hartley/Thor Thordarson. Upper part shows a closed propagating dyke. The lower shows a rift open down to the mantle. The upper version draws its magma from a central volcano, the lower from the mantle. Upper alternative would give a smaller eruption than the lower.

Richie, one of our readers emailed in a good question that is a good starting point for a brief update on Bárðarbunga.

Could you do an article comparing this intrusion to others? Looking at the post it appears that it is almost 40 Km long but how wide is it and in terms of volume. I am not sure if any diagrams are available to give an indication of the size underground. ”

It is hard to compare this intrusion to any other that we have instrumental data on. The main reason is that we have not seen one like this…

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New concerns – Iceland volcano: magma moving towards new volcanic system – could set off another volcano

Thank you Alvin for posting this update on the Bardabunga Volcano in Iceland. A huge amount of magma has moved so very, very quickly, with a number of potential scenarios being examined as a consequence.
I’m keeping an eye on the Azores Islands, by the way. ‘Why?’, I hear you asking. M3.2 and M3.6 affecting the Azores yesterday evening, Universal Time. Just keep a close eye on the Azores, that is all…

The Extinction Protocol

August 2014 ICELAND – The magma from Iceland’s Bardarbunga volcano could be moving towards another large volcanic system. Data recorded by a team from the University of Cambridge suggests that 50 million cubic meters of molten rock has moved in the last 24 hours. If it continues on a northern trajectory it could feed into the Askja volcanic system, potentially triggering a large eruption. Prof Bob White said: “It’s headed straight for it.” But he cautioned that volcanoes were hard to predict. “It’s moving at about 4km a day towards Askja, and if it keeps going it will get there in a few days,” he told BBC News. “We know there is a lot of molten rock sitting under the ground beneath Askja, which is a major volcanic system. If this molten rock hits that, we know it is likely to trigger it to erupt. “But who knows, it…

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